My Boyfriend Is In Sex Therapy?

This article is based on scientific evidence and clinical experience, written by a licensed professional and fact-checked by experts.

Posted: December 18, 2020

Estimated reading time: 3 minutes

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Should I have concerns about the fact that my boyfriend is in sex therapy? Should I be worried about being in a relationship with him?

CASSIE

Welcome to My Counselor Online. I’m Cassie and today one of our awesome counselors is going to answer your question. So let’s go find out what MyCounselor Says.

JOSH

Welcome to my counselor online. I’m Josh Spurlock and today I’m answering a question from Noel. Noel wants to know, Should I have concerns about the fact that my boyfriend is in sex therapy? Should I be worried about being in a relationship with him?

So I’m glad that these are broken up into two questions because they really are two separate issues. The first is sure you should be concerned, you know that you should

You’re in a relationship with someone you care about them. They’re in therapy and you’re wondering you know what’s going on. What do they have need of how can I support them.

What does this mean for our relationship. What does this mean about this personal relationship with are they in a good place to be in a healthy relationship.

Those are questions that you should have. And you should be concerned about. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you should be worried about or that you shouldn’t be in relationship with him.

In fact, for a person to recognize that they can use some help in some areas of their life and to be engaging a therapist to get work around that it’s actually a really good sign.

It demonstrates that a person has insight into their own struggles and difficulties.

It demonstrates that they have the courage to step out and seek help and addressing those things that indicates that their growth orientated and that they want to continue to heal and grow and mature as a person. And those are quality traits that can make for a very healthy relationship and a very healthy person to be in relationship with. And so I’d say yes, that should be a concern for you and you should desire to engage a dialogue and have questions and understand what that’s about. And to be able to allow that information to inform rather not, now’s a good time for this person to be in a relationship. But also I think that you should see that as being a good thing that they are engaging help and reaching out to continue in their own growth process and see that as a sign of maturity and potentially the sign of somebody that you really want to be in relationship with.

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This article is based on scientific evidence and clinical experience, written by a licensed professional and fact-checked by experts.

About the Author
Josh Spurlock
Josh Spurlock

Josh Spurlock MA, LPC, CST, has a BA in Biblical Languages and a Masters in Counseling. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), holding licenses in MissouriColorado, and Florida. He is also a Certified Sex Therapist (CST), Level 2 AEDP Therapist, and an Ordained Minister. He is an Advanced Practice Clinician, with over 10,000 hours of clinical experience. He specializes in Marriage Counseling, Sex Therapy, Family Counseling, and works with Executives, Pastors, Business Owners, and Ministry Leaders. Learn more about Josh Spurlock at JoshSpurlock.com.

Josh is currently unable to take on any new clients.

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